Skip to main content

Education Not Deportation

warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home1/nooneisi/public_html/toronto/modules/taxonomy/taxonomy.pages.inc on line 34.

The Star: School Board endorses `don't ask, don't tell'

May 26, 2006
NICHOLAS KEUNG - The Toronto Star

Canada's largest school board has adopted, in principle, a "don't ask, don't tell" policy when it comes to dealing with students who may not have legal status in the country.

Toronto District School Board trustees voted unanimously this week to designate staff to work with city council, the police board and social agencies to come up with a common protocol — one that would ensure non-status migrants and their children aren't turned away from services and pushed further underground out of fear.

"We need to show some courage and leadership, that we are not allowing our kids to be used as pawns," said Trustee Josh Matlow (Ward 11, St. Paul's), to the applause of more than two dozen supporters of the motion.

ACCESS TO EDUCATION WITHOUT FEAR OF DEPORTATION!

May/24/2006 - 6:30 pm

WED. MAY 24, 2006
ACCESS TO EDUCATION WITHOUT FEAR OF DEPORTATION!
6:30PM, TORONTO DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD OFFICE, 5050 YONGE ST.

Educators, Parents, Students & Concerned Community Members,

On Thursday April 27th, Kimberly and Gerald Lizano-Sossa were picked up at their school by immigration officials and taken to the Rexdale immigration holding centre. Thefollowing day, while the traumatized school community rallied in their support, two other children were picked up, this time at St. Jude's Catholic School, where they were held as 'bait' until their mother arrived. In both cases, the families and school communities have been traumatized, and the sense of security that students should have at school has been seriously undermined. These incidents stand as stark examples of necessity of a strong policy to ensure that all learners have access to education without fear.

Help us to ensure that all Toronto-area students have ACCESS TO EDUCATION without the fear that Immigration Enforcement agents will enter and disrupt students' classrooms and lives.

Syndicate content